Category: Diverting military part of our taxes

Campaigning in parliament for a Peace Tax

The last time Conscience launched a Bill in parliament, trying to change the law so that citizens have the right to conscientiously object to paying the military proportion of their taxes, was in 2016. The Bill called for a Peace Tax.  You can read about the Taxes for Peace Bill 2016 here: https://www.conscienceonline.org.uk/our-previous-work/new-taxes-for-peace-draft-bill/ I have […]

International webinar marks Global Days of Action on Military Spending

I was very excited to be invited to speak at an international webinar ‘Move the Nuclear Weapons (and Fossil Fuel) Money‘ on 21 April. The webinar was organised by Abolition 2000, Basel Peace Office, Move the Nuclear Weapons Money, Parliamentarians for Nuclear Non-proliferation and Disarmament, and the World Future Council. Conscience worked with many of […]

Part of me still frightened and frozen inside – after standing outside Faslane nuclear weapons base

A few weeks ago I went to Faslane in Scotland; to HM Naval Base Clyde where the submarines carrying UK nuclear weapons are based. I went as part of a group from the 15th International Conference on War Tax Resistance and Peace Tax Campaigns.  The people in the group were from five countries.  It was […]

Anne’s story

Anne McCullagh-DLyske is a war tax resister and an Executive Committee member of Conscience: Taxes For Peace Not War.  She is also the Coordinator of Conscience in Scotland. She has been tireless in organising the 15th International Conference on War Tax Resistance and Peace Tax Campaigns which is taking place in Edinburgh later this month. […]

Count the money we spend on nuclear weapons – and divert it to saving our climate

The National Audit Office forecast that the UK would spend £5.2 billion on its nuclear weapons programme in 2018-2019. It is almost impossible to imagine the horror that would be unleashed if just one of those nuclear weapons were ever used. £5.2 billion is such a huge amount of money it is difficult to visualise […]